Premed Students: Effective Strategies for Getting a Stellar Letter of Recommendation

Letters of recommendation can make or break your medical school application. These letters should tell the medical school admissions board about your character and your work ethic, as well as your academic qualifications. Your letter writers need to have had some personal experience with you to accurately and passionately write about those qualities. The best choices are a premed advisor, a supervisor from your clinical work or research work, or a professor in your area of study. Teaching assistants, politicians, or family friends may not be as effective in telling your story.

 

Once you decide who you want to write your letter, you still need to ask early enough in the year to make sure that the writer has time to craft a great letter and has the time to get the information to the admissions board before the deadline. You should always ask in person or by phone and make sure that the letter will be a supportive one.

 

Once your mentor agrees to write a letter, you should give him all the necessary information to complete your recommendation. This includes all addresses, deadlines, and names, a copy of your resume and personal statement, a summary of your professional experience, and stamped pre-addressed envelopes. Follow up in two weeks to make sure the letter arrived at the medical school of your choice; if not, request that a second letter be sent. Remember to send a thank-you note to each letter writer as well.

 

Recommendation letters require careful planning and consideration since they could impact your future as a medical student. For more information about obtaining recommendation letters, visit National Premed Consulting.

 

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8 Responses to “Premed Students: Effective Strategies for Getting a Stellar Letter of Recommendation”

  1. WebMarka Says:

    Virtually every medical student experiences extreme stress throughout his or her studies. The medical school experience, by definition, is stressful. If other people seem to be less stressed than you, it’s not because they are experiencing fewer stressors than you. It may be true that some of your classmates make better use of stress management techniques than you do, but that’s something you can easily change. It’s up to you to choose to learn and follow effective strategies for managing stress .

  2. GrandSmeta Says:

    Take advantage of your hour breaks in between class. Study for 40 minutes while you are running an experiment in research. Use the two hours before your next premed meeting to study.

  3. SPSS Says:

    It’s a no-brainer that your journey to becoming a physician requires studying, and a lot of it. Whether it’s organic chemistry, Spanish vocabulary, or the dreaded MCAT, being a premed or post-bacc student means being constantly tested on your ability to recall facts and work through complex problems.

  4. ArtMoney Says:

    The study authors found that highlighting and underlining materials, rereading, summarization, keyword mnemonics and imagery use were the least effective study techniques, despite their ubiquitous use by students. These methods are considered passive forms of learning, which the study authors argue do not sufficiently engage the brain’s memory-retention pathways and thus do not promote long-term effective learning.

  5. EGAIS Says:

    It’s a no-brainer that your journey to becoming a physician requires studying, and a lot of it. Whether it’s organic chemistry, Spanish vocabulary, or the dreaded MCAT, being a premed or post-bacc student means being constantly tested on your ability to recall facts and work through complex problems.

  6. PatternMaker Says:

    The study authors found that highlighting and underlining materials, rereading, summarization, keyword mnemonics and imagery use were the least effective study techniques, despite their ubiquitous use by students. These methods are considered passive forms of learning, which the study authors argue do not sufficiently engage the brain’s memory-retention pathways and thus do not promote long-term effective learning.

  7. Kladr Gnivc Says:

    I was shocked that some strategies that students use a lot such as re-reading and highlighting seem to provide minimal benefits to their learning and performance, said Dr. John Dunlosky , professor of psychology and director of experimental training at Kent State University, about the study techniques that today’s students use.

  8. Декларация З-НДФЛ Says:

    It’s a no-brainer that your journey to becoming a physician requires studying, and a lot of it. Whether it’s organic chemistry, Spanish vocabulary, or the dreaded MCAT, being a premed or post-bacc student means being constantly tested on your ability to recall facts and work through complex problems.

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